Tag Archive: google


Getting Organized

As I flip through the TV channels on mute and listen to the clock tick quickly, I’m struck by the chaos that I’m living in.  Clothes, books and loose papers are strewn across my unmade bed.  My backpack is stuffed with crumpled-up handouts, notes and newspapers.  Although I’ve made it to each class today, I have no idea what my assignments entail for this week.

It’s time for some (early) spring cleaning.

If a messy, disorderly room is making you equally stressed out, look no further.  There are plenty of easy ways to get yourself – and your life – organized in mere minutes.

Get a planner or Google calendar. I literally can’t imagine how I’d function without my planner.  It contains every detail of my packed schedule, from classes to meetings to cocktails.    There’s nothing worse than forgetting about a club meeting, coffee date or deadline.  Putting commitments in writing, whether they’re required or with friends, will prevent you from realizing when you have to be somewhere across campus and have only five minutes to get there.

Organize your coursework. For the past few weeks of class, I’ve been taking notes for all seven of my classes on whatever paper I’ve had on hand.  My Spanish notes are in the same notebook as those from Political Science, and who knows where my News Writing notes have gone.  This system may work for a while, but when midterms roll around, it will be nearly impossible to compile all notes, papers and old quizzes. It’s essential to have a separate notebook and/or binder for each class.  You’ll be so much happier come exam time when cramming in Davis is as simple as opening a notebook and buckling down.  Though it may not be the most appealing pastime, it sounds much more appealing than riffling through knee-high stacks of papers in desperate search of the first weeks’ notes and your (unopened?) textbook.

Keep things neat. Studies have shown that it’s easier to get work done in tidy spaces.  Messes are distracting, stressful and all-around unpleasant.  Taking a few minutes to make your bed, hang up clothes and organize your desk can make studying so much more comfortable and relaxing. This applies to your computer, too.  Clean out and organize your inbox.  It will keep you from losing track of e-mails you were supposed to respond to but forgot about.  As mind-numbing as it sounds, it will help out in the long run.

Make a schedule and stick to it. It’s so easy to put off a night’s readings to hang out with friends, watch TV or catch up on sleep.  But when this happens repeatedly, you’ll find yourself hundreds of pages behind in multiple classes with one night before a test. Set goals for each day, even if it means getting up a few minutes early to read some extra pages.  It will make life so much less stressful.  Plus, you’ll be less embarrassed when the professor asks you a question in class and you can actually answer it.

Getting organized is easier than you’d think.  I just bought notebooks and binders at Student Stores.  Tonight I’m going to print out my syllabi, write down my assignments for this week and catch up on the reading I haven’t done.

…Or maybe I’ll put that off to another night.

-Georgia Cavanaugh

Okay, so this year has been pretty tough on movies. We had a long series of summer flops saved only by the box-office success of “Inception,” and the fall-winter line up didn’t look to be much more impressive. I was just about to hand in the towel and give up on 2010 as a year for movies when The Social Network came along. I’ll admit it, I was more than a little skeptical that the “Facebook” movie was already here, but from all accounts, it was supposed to be a good movie.

Well, all accounts were wrong.  The Social Network isn’t a good movie; it’s a great movie, and possibly one of the most culturally relevant films to come out in the past several years. The movie follows Mark Zuckerberg, the creator of Facebook, from his days at Harvard trying to get into a Final Club through the creation of Facebook, its success and ultimately his legal battles with those who helped get him there, including his best friend and co-founder, Eduardo Saverin.

The movie moves quickly and keeps audiences captivated with some of the wittiest dialogue I’ve heard in years and a solid use of flashback/flashforwards as narrative devices.  The acting was solid and the film boasts one of the most impressive scores ever. The boating crew race, set to a rock adaptation of “In the Hall of the Mountain King,” is quite possibly one of the best scenes I have ever seen and will make any film fan geek out with joy.

The movie tracks not only the path of Zuckerberg as he becomes the youngest billionaire in the world, but also follows the growing social impact of Facebook itself. Let’s face it, it’s difficult to remember a time before Facebook came around. If you’re a senior, you were a sophomore in high school when it began, freshmen were still in middle school, and it has changed the way people, especially college students, socialize.

Social Networking used to be limited to personal blogs and other sites such as MySpace; Facebook, however, took the whole game to a new level and now dominates not only the social networking scene, but the entire internet. Google recently released a list of the top 13 websites visited in 2010. Facebook was No. 1 with over 570 billion page visits, consuming more than 35 percent of all Internet use in the United States. The No. 2 website, Yahoo, received 70 billion page visits – a mere 12 percent of Facebook’s traffic.

Anyone who has a Facebook account should definitely make a point to go see this movie because whether you would like to admit it or not, this movie is in part about you and how one little website created by a Harvard computer science geek changed the way you share your lives with your friends, family and the world.

Also, buy the soundtrack. It’s amazing.

– Samantha Ryan

Have you Googled yourself today?

I realized I was finally growing up when I developed a new obsession. Gone are the days of outrageous shopping (I used to live at Nordstrom), constant TV watching (I totally forgot about the Grey’s Anatomy season premier ), and spending my Saturday afternoons enthralled in hours of College Football (even Carolina games are trying my patience – Hakeem Nicks, we need you back). Instead, I find myself constantly tweeting, looking for connections on LinkedIn, and (you guessed it) blogging.

I confess: A year ago, I didn’t even know what Twitter was. Even a few weeks ago, I didn’t have any real interest in blogging. But as of Tuesday, I am officially captivated. My name is Amy Dobrzynski, and I am a social media addict.

It all started when Kelly Giles (former President of Blue & White) came to talk to Carolina Public Relations Student Society of America. And it probably didn’t help that I was surrounded by seniors who were all starting to freak out about getting (or not getting) jobs. But when I learned that it’s not really your impressive resume that lands you the job, I was floored.

So, humor me for a second. Open up Google. Type in your name. What kind of results show up?

I am one of the lucky ones. There is only one Amy Dobrzynski out there, and you’re looking at her. My Google results are pretty straightforward (Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, my blog, various entries from The Daily Tar Heel and Blue & White, etc.). But I’m guessing most of you aren’t having the same luck. And chances are that your future employers are going to be Googling you as well.

So how do we change the lack of Google results and increase our chances of getting hired? By developing an online presence through social media.

Here are a few tips from an (albeit fairly new) social media enthusiast:

1. Facebook – keep it private. You are not going to stop your friends from posting inappropriate things on your wall, and you definitely don’t want to risk your employers seeing it. Facebook should be your social outlet, so let’s keep it that way. (Sidenote – University Career Services friended me on Facebook the other day. I didn’t even know they knew what that was.)

2. Twitter – I know we all love bashing Lindsay Lohan, but what does that say about you as a person, besides the fact that you are up-to-date on your celebrity gossip? Tweet about something interesting to you (that future employers will find interesting, too). Business major? ReTweet something from the Wall Street Journal. English enthusiast? Tweet about the great book you just read.

3. LinkedIn – You have tons of connections at your fingertips, and I bet you didn’t even know it. Have you had an internship? There’s a good chance your employers are on this networking site. I’ve even found a couple of teachers on LinkedIn. But make sure you actually know someone before you start going connection crazy. No one likes random friend requests on Facebook, and professionals definitely don’t like them on LinkedIn.

4. Blogs – This is your chance to show off your own personal style, so have some fun with this! Keep it professional, of course, but make sure you show off your creative side.

5. Stay classy – If you’re going to use pictures on any of these sites (and you should), make sure they represent you, and how classy you are. No red cups, please.

6. Start Early – I had a quarter-life crisis this summer. I turned 20 and could no longer use “but I’m a teenager!” as an excuse. Now, I’m a junior and I’m already freaking out about finding a job in this economy. Don’t wait until the last minute to get caught up on social media – you will only put more pressure on yourself!

7. Branding – Create a brand for yourself. For non-PR majors, a brand is something you use to market yourself to employers. Pick a few adjectives that describe you and then incorporate them into all of your social media outlets. Make sure you use a consistent name. Employers don’t have time to go searching around for you. If you need help with branding, UCS is having a Personal Branding seminar Sept. 29.

-Amy Dobrzynski