Tag Archive: Michael Pollan


Anne Kreuser is blogging while studying abroad in London this semester.

I’m living with 13 other people this semester.  13!  This means there’s a fair representation of vegetarians in the bunch.  I’ve read enough Michael Pollan to know that simply reducing your meat intake is one of the easiest ways to reduce your carbon footprint, so this veg-influence has got my culinary mind whirring. I found a recipe for eggless double chocolate cookies that are called World Peace Cookies for a reason.  I’ve successfully completed the majority of my shopping at the farmers market on Saturday mornings.  But as the weather turns chillier, I want to feel warm and full and satisfied.  And I’ve found the perfect ingredient.

Quinoa is a grain that is actually related to spinach.  It’s packed with protein, magnesium and iron, making it the perfect addition to anyone’s diet, especially a vegetarian’s. Taking only minutes to cook, it’s a snap to make, and its mild, nutty flavor pairs extremely well with savory and sweet dishes.  Pick some up next time you’re grocery shopping, and try out these vegetarian recipe ideas.

Quinoa with mushrooms and onions

1 yellow onion, diced

1 package shitake mushrooms, sliced

1 t. fresh thyme

1 c. white wine (can substitute vegetable stock)

1 c. quinoa

2 c. water

1 t. olive oil

Bring water to a boil, add quinoa and cook until slightly underdone.  Quinoa should still have a bite, about 10 minutes.

In the meantime, sautee onion in large skillet in olive oil until translucent, about 5 minutes.  Add mushrooms and thyme.  Cook until mushrooms are browned and tender.  Add cooked quinoa and white wine.  Cook and stir until quinoa has absorbed most of the white wine and the pan becomes dry, about 5 minutes.

Quinoa parfait

1 c. Greek yogurt

2 T. honey

½ c. cooked and cooled quinoa

Hand full of fresh berries

Layer ingredients in a wine glass for a beautiful presentation, or pack away in a reusable plastic container for a morning pick-me-up between classes.

– Anne Kreuser

Advertisements

Eat, Love, Pay?

I was lucky enough to share a cup of coffee on Tuesday with Chris Taylor, director of Food Fight, a documentary that portrays the history of America’s food system and America’s current food culture. The documentary was screened on campus by FLO Foods.  The film was certainly provocative; charts and graphs of the death of farms in the U.S. after WWII were shocking, and interviews with food world royalty (Michael Pollan, Alice Waters, Marion Nestle, and more) that detailed the current state of things were depressing.

Guglhupf Fritatta Special

But after much more reflection, I realized the gastronomic opportunity that we, as Carolina students, are presented with.  The local food movement that is near omnipresent in the Triangle area is getting some national attention. The New York Times featured three of Durham’s restaurants that cook with a local conscious, all of which are about a 15-minute car ride away from campus.  Weaver Street Market is an afternoon’s stroll away, the Carrboro Farmer’s Market allows customers to shake hands with their produce producers and Chapel Hill Creamery couldn’t produce more delicious cheeses.  For those of us ready to make a statement with our food dollars, as Taylor said in his film, being a student in Chapel Hill is a great place to be.

I’ve just started putting this “Eat Local” mantra to the test.  Can you reasonably, affordably and satisfactorily eat food produced locally and not eat salads every meal? Today was incredibly successful.  I visited Guglhupf on 15-501 and had a delicious brunch.  I ordered the frittata special which changes daily.  Mine arrived with spring onions, asparagus and goat cheese, along with fresh fruit and a hearty hunk of freshly baked baguette.  Along with a coffee from Carrboro Coffee Company, it was a breakfast fit for a paper-writing machine of a college student.  And for $6.75 my stomach couldn’t have been happier. So my Food Fight continues, hopefully with just as much delicious success.

– Anne Kreuser